DEFINITIONS

Adult – a household member aged 16 or more (as at 1 January of the reference year).

Adult with child(ren) – a household with one adult and at least one child.

Child – a household member aged 0–15 (as at 1 January of the reference year).

Consumption expenditure – monetary and non-monetary expenditure per household member that is connected with consumption.

Couple with one child – a legally married or cohabiting couple with one child.

Couple with two children – a legally married or cohabiting couple with two children.

Couple with three or more children – a legally married or cohabiting couple with at least three children.

Couple with minor and adult children – a legally married or cohabiting couple with at least one minor and one adult child whose mother or father is the member of the same household.

Educational level of the head of the household (reference person) – the highest level of the head of the household.

Expenditure – monetary and non-monetary consumption expenditure and other expenditure.

Gini coefficient – used in order to measure the inequality in the society.

Head of the household (reference person) – an adult household member with the largest long-term contribution to the household income.

Household – a group of people who live in the common main dwelling (at the same address) and share joint financial and/or food resources and whose members consider themselves to be one household. Household can also consist of one member only.

Main dwelling – the dwelling where during a longer period the person is spending / has spent

- most of the year,

- most of the time free from work / studies.

Main dwelling of a legally married or cohabiting person is the dwelling where he/she spends most of the time spent with his/her partner or/and children.

Non-monetary consumption – consumption of non-monetary income and other expenditure.

Other expenditure – expenditure on donations, monetary gifts, alimonies paid out of household, fines.

Other household – a household, which does not fall under any of the above-mentioned groups (e.g., three-generation household etc.).

Retired household – a non-working and non-unemployed household with at least one non-working old-age pensioner.

Rural settlements – small towns and villages.

Two-generation household – a household with adult children and their parents.

Unemployed household – a non-working household with at least one unemployed member aged 16 or more (i.e., who is not working, is looking for a job and is prepared to start working within two weeks).

Urban settlements – cities, cities without municipal status and towns.

Working household – a household with at least one working member aged 16 or more.

METHODOLOGY

Gini coefficient is calculated on the basis of the expenditure per household member in a month.The Gini coefficient is 0 if the expenditures of all households are equal and it is 1 if all the expenditures have been made by one and the same household. Consequently, the nearer the coefficient is to 1, the larger is the inequality in the society. The value of the Gini coefficient depends on the equivalence scales used.The equivalence scales are the agreed share of the consumption of a household member — the consumption unit of the household member. In order to make the consumption of households with differing structures mutually comparable, empirically justified equivalence scales representing household members must be used. These determine the participation of various household members in the total consumption by the household, expressed in relative figures related to the first adult household member. Generally the additional adults’ and children’s equivalence scales are also differentiated. In wealthier societies, as regards the average consumption, the share of the first household member is generally relatively high (this shows the high proportion of the household’s consumption structure spent on its shared living environment). Countries use the equivalence scales. The use of equivalence scales allows eliminating the effect resulting from the household structure. The value of the equivalence scales for the first adult is always 1,0 and for the other adult members of the household it is the second coefficient in the equivalence scales. The value of the equivalence scales for children is the third coefficient in the equivalence scales.

MORE DATA

Eesti statistika aastaraamat. Statistical Yearbook of Estonia

Maakonnad arvudes. Counties in Figures

Minifacts about Estonia

Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania in Figures

CONTACT PERSON

Anu Υmblus

Social Statistics and Analysis Department

Tel +372 625 8482

anu.omblus@stat.ee

 

Updated: 07.08.2018